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School of Environment, Education and Development

Teacher with school children
BA English Language for Education
Develop your knowledge of English language and its relationship with education.

BA English Language for Education

Year of entry: 2018

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Arts
Duration
3 years
Typical A-level offer

ABB

Typical International Baccalaureate offer

32 points overall with 6,5,5 at Higher level

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS .

Course overview

  • A unique course focusing on English language and its connections with education
  • Excellent work experience opportunities via study placements to enhance your employability
  • Small-group teaching and guided, one-to-one supervision

Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2018 will be announced once confirmed by the UK government. As a guide, the 2017 tuition fees were £9,250 per annum for home/EU students, and are expected to increase slightly for 2018 entry. Tuition fees for international students will be £18,000 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Contact details

Academic department
School of Environment, Education and Development
Contact name
Nicola Allard
Telephone
+44 161 275 0969
Email
Website
http://www.seed.manchester.ac.uk/education/
Academic department overview
See: The School .

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

Grades ABB. There are no specific subjects required but a modern or classical language, English Language, Psychology or Communication Studies is an advantage. General Studies is welcomed but not normally included as part of the standard offer.

AS-level

Two AS levels are not accepted in place of one A level.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

English Language at grade C or above (Grade 4 or above in the newly reformed GCSEs in England).

International Baccalaureate

32 points overall with 6,5,5 at Higher level

Irish Leaving Certificate

H1, H1, H2, H2

Scottish requirements

We normally require five Scottish Highers at grades AABBC / ABBBB or two Advanced Highers at grades BB plus two Highers at grades BB.

English Language and Mathematics not taken at Higher/Advanced Higher must have been achieved at SCQF level 5 (minimum National 5 grade C / Intermediate 2 grade C / Standard Grade Credit level grade 3).

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

We require minimum grade A from the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate.

European Baccalaureate

Acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications. Applications from students studying for this qualification are welcome and all such applicants will be considered on an individual basis. Overall grades of 75- 80%.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Pearson BTEC qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

We consider the National Extended Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Diploma with grades DDM

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

We consider the National Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Diploma with grades DM plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A Level at grade B.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma

We consider the National Foundation Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Foundation Diploma with grades DM plus additional level 3 qualifications such as A Levels at grade BB.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

We consider the National Extended Certificate for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Certificate with grade D plus additional Level 3 qualifications such as A Levels at grades BB. 

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course (The only subjects we accept for this qualification are.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Diploma with grades DMM 

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades DM plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A Level at grade B.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Foundation Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades DM plus additional level 3 qualifications such as A Level at grade BB. 

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Certificate for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Certificate with grade D plus additional Level 3 qualifications such as A Levels at grades BB. 

Access to HE Diploma

Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3. Minimum of 30 credits with a distinction grade, with the remaining level 3 credits at merit. Applicants must have GCSE in English and Maths at grade C or 4.

Advanced Placement tests

The University welcomes applicants with the AP qualification. Such applications will be considered on an individual basis.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken.

Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3, M2, M2 in the Pre-U and ABB at A level in three distinct subjects.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines

English language

Students whose first language or language of instruction is not English may be asked to provide evidence of fluency in English by achieving scores in English language tests as follows:

  • An overall score of 6.5 at IELTS, with 6.5 in writing and no sub-section below 6.0 or
  • TOEFL iBT overall score of 90 with a minimum score of 22 in writing and 20 in the other sub-sections or
  • Pearson PTE overall score of 59 with a minimum score of 59 in writing and 51 in the other subsections or
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) overall score of 176 or above, with 176 in writing and no sub-section below 169 -OR- Grade C if taken before January 2015(Please note that the Cambridge First Certificate in English is not acceptable.)

English language test validity

Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS .

Advice to applicants

Applicants submitting mitigating circumstances

Mitigating circumstances may be personal or family illness, other family circumstances, change of teachers during a course, problems with school facilities or an unusual curriculum followed by your school or college. We recommend that information on mitigating circumstances that have affected or are likely to affect your academic performance will be included in the referee's report. We cannot usually take into account information that is supplied after an adverse decision has been made on an application by the admitting School. If you encounter mitigating circumstances after you have submitted your application, please inform the admissions staff in the School to which you applied as soon as possible. Where mitigating circumstances have already been taken into account, for example by the relevant Exam Board, we will not be able to make further allowances.

How your application is considered

All applications should be submitted via UCAS and are considered on a case by case basis.

Interview requirements

Interviews are not conducted as part of the recruitment process for this course.

Returning to education

Return-to-learn students are those who have had a substantial period away from any formal learning. Often such learners have pursued careers or raised a family. The University understands that students come from many different backgrounds, with varying qualifications, careers and skills, but they often bring to their studies a high degree of motivation and experience.

The University recognises that standard selection measures and procedures may not enable these learners to demonstrate fully their suitability for their chosen course. Where appropriate, admissions officers will seek and consider alternative evidence in order to give such learners equivalent consideration. Where they deem this alternative evidence meets entry criteria fully the learner will not be required to meet the standard academic entry requirements.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

Direct entry into either year 2 or 3 is not possible on the BA (Hons) English Language for Education course.  We are able to consider transfer applications for Year 1 entry.

Course details

Course description

This is a unique degree, focusing specifically on English language and its connections with education. It will provide you with an understanding of the current issues and theories within the fields of both English language and education, as well as seeing how the two interrelate.

You will explore language use, the nature of spoken and written communication, educational issues, and how language reflects and impacts upon wider society and culture. Maybe you have a strong interest in how people learn, either culturally, socially or psychologically. Or maybe you love studying contemporary English language and want to find out how it can be applied across a range of real-world settings. You will also explore the psychology and sociology of learning, as well as examining public policy in relation to issues of access, fairness and social justice.

We pride ourselves on close staff-student relationships, small-group teaching and guided, one-to-one supervision. You are encouraged to develop knowledge in areas that are of specific interest to you, through selecting optional course units and your choice of a research project for your final-year dissertation.

Aims

The BA (Hons) English Language for Education will prepare you for a career in teaching or a range of related fields. You will go beyond the textbook to explore how language and education work in the real world.

Special features

  • The University of Manchester is Top 5 in the UK for education-related studies ( The Times University League Table 2015 ).
  • A unique degree focusing on English language and its connections with education.
  • Excellent work experience opportunities via study placements to enhance your employability.
  • Our writing centre - Write Away - will assist you with your essay drafts to identify weaknesses and strengths early on, allowing you to refine your written assignments before submission.
  • Progression to postgraduate teacher training is common and The University of Manchester's PGCEs are rated as outstanding by Ofsted.

Additional course information

Workplace-based Research Placement

A workplace-based research placement in year two will allow you to explore the various theories discussed in year one and understand how they actually work outside the textbook. For example, you can find out how people perceive accents in the media, as well as their own by setting up your own focus group, or investigate why girls tend to outperform boys in literacy. You undertake your placement in a workplace of interest to you, for example, within a school or a multilingual classroom.

Previous students have used their placement to gain experience working in local schools or colleges. Others have travelled the globe participating in local projects (such as building a new school for children in Ghana) or examining unusual teaching practices (such as the use of music in New Zealand schools to engage autistic children).

You will be supervised by an academic who researches your chosen topic, such as Special Needs children in primary school, accent and identity in society, classroom learning, media bias in newspapers and marketing techniques using social media.

It is a fantastic opportunity to contribute to research and it gives you a head-start on the key skills of: writing for a variety of audiences; critical thinking; project management; and planning, designing and conducting research.

I flew to Africa and observed teaching methods in a Gambian school for five weeks, whilst teaching 5-18 year olds. This once in a lifetime trip allowed me to not only develop as an individual, but also distinguished me from other potential PGCE candidates. This experience threw me in at the deep end of teaching, especially a week into my placement, when I impromptu taught 45 x 6-13 year old, second language speakers.  (Laura Lovett, Graduate)

Teaching and learning

You will find the BA (Hons) English Language for Education environment a friendly place to study; there is plenty of informal contact between students and lecturers. Our students come from a wide variety of backgrounds; there are school-leavers and mature students, from the UK and from overseas.

A range of teaching and learning methods provides variety and gives you plenty of scope to develop flexibility in your learning. Methods include: lectures; seminars; group tutorials; individual tutorials; self-study materials; computer mediated interaction; group collaboration and teamwork; role plays and simulations; group and individual presentations and research projects.

There are core course units in year one and the first semester of year two, but you are free to select all your other taught course units from a wide range of options. This includes course units from other courses within the Manchester Institute of Education or beyond. This allows you to tailor the degree to your personal or professional interests and your future career aspirations.

In semester two of year two and throughout year three, you are free to select all your taught course units. You will complete a research report and dissertation which may be on any topic which falls within the scope of the degree. They are a great chance for you to carry out an in-depth study in a subject area you find particularly interesting or rewarding.

Coursework and assessment

Types of assessments are varied to ensure you are exposed to more than just one means of assessment. Exams, essays, oral presentations and group projects are used, with exams and essays being the most common.

Written assignments will allow you to demonstrate your knowledge base but also critical thinking skills. In both the second and third years you will have the opportunity to work with an individual supervisor in undertaking and writing up research on a topic of your choosing.

Course content for year 1

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Developing Academic Writing and Digital Study Skills EDUC10631 10 Mandatory
Understanding Research EDUC10642 10 Mandatory
Reading and Writing Processes EDUC10701 10 Mandatory
Exploring Language 1 - Pronunciation EDUC10931 10 Mandatory
Key Issues in Education EDUC11100 20 Mandatory
Language Skills: Listening and Speaking EDUC11881 10 Mandatory
Language Acquisition EDUC11972 20 Mandatory
Exploring Language 2 : Grammar EDUC11982 10 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional

Course content for year 2

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Preparing for your Research Placement EDUC20730 10 Mandatory
Research Placement EDUC20750 20 Mandatory
Career Management EDUC20961 10 Mandatory
Language, Education and Society EDUC21010 20 Mandatory
Psychology of Learning EDUC21740 20 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional
Equity in Education EDUC30651 20 Optional
Bilingualism EDUC30901 20 Optional
Classroom Communication and Learning EDUC31052 20 Optional
Pragmatics and Intercultural Communications EDUC33042 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 11 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Dissertation EDUC30910 40 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional
Equity in Education EDUC30651 20 Optional
Bilingualism EDUC30901 20 Optional
Classroom Communication and Learning EDUC31052 20 Optional
Pragmatics and Intercultural Communications EDUC33042 20 Optional

Scholarships and bursaries

No specific academic scholarships available for this course.

What our students say

Details on what a few of our students have got up to since graduating can be found on the `files to download' page.

Student opinions about the course:

  • 'The format of the programme was very beneficial for me and my career choices as I was able to tailor the course to my own interests and aspirations. Another plus point was the small number of students on the course.' (Joanne Herapath, 2005 graduate)
  • `The course is so flexible, and teaches so many transferable skills, I'm sure I could go and do any career I choose.' (Bob Bardsley, 2006 graduate)
  • 'The course served me really well. The solid grounding it provided in English language and research helped me get into journalism.' (Clare Simpson, 2008 graduate)
  • 'Having a degree in this programme gives many employment opportunities in different sectors. Aside from this you receive top quality support from top quality tutors.' (Amy Hallewell, 2009 graduate)
  • 'A varied, interesting and thought-provoking course.' (Kirsty-Ann Baker, 2010 graduate)
  • 'It's good because the course staff are readily approachable and willing to help.' (William Hanson, 2011 graduate)
  • 'The degree course is exciting and stimulating. The teaching staff create an interactive academic environment that is challenging and rigorous but at the same time feels safe and supportive.' (Dongshuo Wang, 2012 graduate)

Here are three successful websites owned and run by recent graduates:

http://williamhanson.co.uk/

http://secretsoundshop.com/

http://phronesisseo.blogspot.co.uk/

Facilities

The course is taught by the Manchester Institute of Education which has its own Undergraduate Hub where you will find all of your teaching staff and support staff in one place, and is also a place to sit and relax. Manchester Institute of Education is located in the University's Ellen Wilkinson building (77 on the  campus map ) where there is also a common room, cafe, computer clusters, teaching rooms, and a meeting room for students to book for group work. It is centrally located on the University's Oxford Road campus, close to the Main Library, Alan Gilbert Learning Commons and the Students Union.

The University's library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK.  Studying with us will open up a wealth of learning resources to you, including over four million printed books, more than 500,000 ebooks and access to over 40,000 electronic journals and hundreds of online databases. The Alan Gilbert Learning Commons offers you a stimulating 24/7 environment for study. It is the UK's first digital library and home to the most up-to-date IT facilities, a range of versatile learning spaces and a relaxing cafe area for breaks or meeting friends.

The University of Manchester is home to several cultural and tourist destinations, including The Manchester Museum, the John Rylands Library and the Whitworth art gallery, which has recently reopened following a £19 million refurbishment.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

The skills you'll develop, such as written and oral communication, team-working, project management and intercultural awareness, are vital for a variety of careers. You may seek a career in school teaching, or in a related vocation such as TESOL (Teaching of English as a Second or Other Language), speech therapy, special educational needs and adult literacy. Progression to postgraduate teacher training is common and The University of Manchester's Primary and Secondary PGCEs have been rated as outstanding by Ofsted.

Aside from graduates entering education fields, former students have entered careers in both the public and private sector: management; personnel; the media; publishing; the charity sector; journalism; interpreting; counselling; social or development work. Recent graduates have accepted posts within companies such as British Telecom, L'Oriel, the NSPCC, the BBC and Boots PLC.

You will study a Career Management unit in year two which includes guest lectures from people in a variety of occupations. Plus we hold regular `Looking Forward' days in which recent graduates return to tell current students where they are currently working and how they achieved their position. Over 90% of graduates from this course were in employment or further studies within six months of completing the course ( HESA Destination of Leavers from HE Survey, 2014).