Search
Search type

School of Environment, Education and Development

Teacher with school children
BA English Language for Education
Develop your knowledge of English language and its relationship with education.

BA English Language for Education / Course details

Year of entry: 2018

Course description

This is a unique degree, focusing specifically on English language and its connections with education. It will provide you with an understanding of the current issues and theories within the fields of both English language and education, as well as seeing how the two interrelate.

You will explore language use, the nature of spoken and written communication, educational issues, and how language reflects and impacts upon wider society and culture. Maybe you have a strong interest in how people learn, either culturally, socially or psychologically. Or maybe you love studying contemporary English language and want to find out how it can be applied across a range of real-world settings. You will also explore the psychology and sociology of learning, as well as examining public policy in relation to issues of access, fairness and social justice.

We pride ourselves on close staff-student relationships, small-group teaching and guided, one-to-one supervision. You are encouraged to develop knowledge in areas that are of specific interest to you, through selecting optional course units and your choice of a research project for your final-year dissertation.

Aims

The BA (Hons) English Language for Education will prepare you for a career in teaching or a range of related fields. You will go beyond the textbook to explore how language and education work in the real world.

Special features

  • A unique degree focusing on English language and its connections with education.
  • Excellent work experience opportunities via study placements to enhance your employability.
  • Progression to postgraduate teacher training is common and The University of Manchester's PGCEs are rated as outstanding by Ofsted.

Additional course information

Workplace-based Research Placement

A workplace-based research placement in year two will allow you to explore the various theories discussed in year one and understand how they actually work outside the textbook. For example, you can find out how people perceive accents in the media, as well as their own by setting up your own focus group, or investigate why girls tend to outperform boys in literacy. You undertake your placement in a workplace of interest to you, for example, within a school or a multilingual classroom.

Previous students have used their placement to gain experience working in local schools or colleges. Others have travelled the globe participating in local projects (such as building a new school for children in Ghana) or examining unusual teaching practices (such as the use of music in New Zealand schools to engage autistic children).

You will be supervised by an academic who researches your chosen topic, such as Special Needs children in primary school, accent and identity in society, classroom learning, media bias in newspapers and marketing techniques using social media.

It is a fantastic opportunity to contribute to research and it gives you a head-start on the key skills of: writing for a variety of audiences; critical thinking; project management; and planning, designing and conducting research.

I flew to Africa and observed teaching methods in a Gambian school for five weeks, whilst teaching 5-18 year olds. This once in a lifetime trip allowed me to not only develop as an individual, but also distinguished me from other potential PGCE candidates. This experience threw me in at the deep end of teaching, especially a week into my placement, when I impromptu taught 45 x 6-13 year old, second language speakers.  (Laura Lovett, Graduate)

Teaching and learning

You will find the BA (Hons) English Language for Education environment a friendly place to study; there is plenty of informal contact between students and lecturers. Our students come from a wide variety of backgrounds; there are school-leavers and mature students, from the UK and from overseas.

A range of teaching and learning methods provides variety and gives you plenty of scope to develop flexibility in your learning. Methods include: lectures; seminars; group tutorials; individual tutorials; self-study materials; computer mediated interaction; group collaboration and teamwork; role plays and simulations; group and individual presentations and research projects.

There are core course units in year one and the first semester of year two, but you are free to select all your other taught course units from a wide range of options. This includes course units from other courses within the Manchester Institute of Education or beyond. This allows you to tailor the degree to your personal or professional interests and your future career aspirations.

In semester two of year two and throughout year three, you are free to select all your taught course units. You will complete a research report and dissertation which may be on any topic which falls within the scope of the degree. They are a great chance for you to carry out an in-depth study in a subject area you find particularly interesting or rewarding.

Coursework and assessment

Types of assessments are varied to ensure you are exposed to more than just one means of assessment. Exams, essays, oral presentations and group projects are used, with exams and essays being the most common.

Written assignments will allow you to demonstrate your knowledge base but also critical thinking skills. In both the second and third years you will have the opportunity to work with an individual supervisor in undertaking and writing up research on a topic of your choosing.

Course content for year 1

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Developing Academic Writing and Digital Study Skills EDUC10631 10 Mandatory
Understanding Research EDUC10642 10 Mandatory
Reading and Writing Processes EDUC10701 10 Mandatory
Exploring Language 1 - Pronunciation EDUC10931 10 Mandatory
Key Issues in Education EDUC11100 20 Mandatory
Language Skills: Listening and Speaking EDUC11881 10 Mandatory
Language Acquisition EDUC11972 20 Mandatory
Exploring Language 2 : Grammar EDUC11982 10 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional

Course content for year 2

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Preparing for your Research Placement EDUC20730 10 Mandatory
Research Placement EDUC20750 20 Mandatory
Career Management EDUC20961 10 Mandatory
Language, Education and Society EDUC21010 20 Mandatory
Psychology of Learning EDUC21740 20 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional
Equity in Education EDUC30651 20 Optional
Bilingualism EDUC30901 20 Optional
Classroom Communication and Learning EDUC31052 20 Optional
Pragmatics and Intercultural Communications EDUC33042 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 11 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Dissertation EDUC30910 40 Mandatory
Teaching and Learning of Mathematics EDUC22002 20 Optional
Digital Technologies in Education EDUC22021 20 Optional
Equity in Education EDUC30651 20 Optional
Bilingualism EDUC30901 20 Optional
Classroom Communication and Learning EDUC31052 20 Optional
Pragmatics and Intercultural Communications EDUC33042 20 Optional

Scholarships and bursaries

No specific academic scholarships available for this course.

What our students say

Details on what a few of our students have got up to since graduating can be found on the `files to download' page.

Student opinions about the course:

  • 'The format of the programme was very beneficial for me and my career choices as I was able to tailor the course to my own interests and aspirations. Another plus point was the small number of students on the course.' (Joanne Herapath, 2005 graduate)
  • `The course is so flexible, and teaches so many transferable skills, I'm sure I could go and do any career I choose.' (Bob Bardsley, 2006 graduate)
  • 'The course served me really well. The solid grounding it provided in English language and research helped me get into journalism.' (Clare Simpson, 2008 graduate)
  • 'Having a degree in this programme gives many employment opportunities in different sectors. Aside from this you receive top quality support from top quality tutors.' (Amy Hallewell, 2009 graduate)
  • 'A varied, interesting and thought-provoking course.' (Kirsty-Ann Baker, 2010 graduate)
  • 'It's good because the course staff are readily approachable and willing to help.' (William Hanson, 2011 graduate)
  • 'The degree course is exciting and stimulating. The teaching staff create an interactive academic environment that is challenging and rigorous but at the same time feels safe and supportive.' (Dongshuo Wang, 2012 graduate)

Here are three successful websites owned and run by recent graduates:

http://williamhanson.co.uk/

http://secretsoundshop.com/

http://phronesisseo.blogspot.co.uk/

Facilities

The course is taught by the Manchester Institute of Education which has its own Undergraduate Hub where you will find all of your teaching staff and support staff in one place, and is also a place to sit and relax. Manchester Institute of Education is located in the University's Ellen Wilkinson building (77 on the  campus map ) where there is also a common room, cafe, computer clusters, teaching rooms, and a meeting room for students to book for group work. It is centrally located on the University's Oxford Road campus, close to the Main Library, Alan Gilbert Learning Commons and the Students Union.

The University's library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK.  Studying with us will open up a wealth of learning resources to you, including over four million printed books, more than 500,000 ebooks and access to over 40,000 electronic journals and hundreds of online databases. The Alan Gilbert Learning Commons offers you a stimulating 24/7 environment for study. It is the UK's first digital library and home to the most up-to-date IT facilities, a range of versatile learning spaces and a relaxing cafe area for breaks or meeting friends.

The University of Manchester is home to several cultural and tourist destinations, including The Manchester Museum, the John Rylands Library and the Whitworth art gallery, which has recently reopened following a £19 million refurbishment.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk